YesLawDVD Tips for Attorneys

Why We Recommend our YesLawDVD Deliverable Disc for Litigators

Online Tutorial

The Subtitles Do Not Show in My Clips

The Video Will Not Play in PowerPoint

How Do I Export Clips to a DVD Video Disc

Synchronized Transcript File Formats

Video Formats

Playback in a DVD Player

Operation within a PC

Searching the Transcript

Highlighting Transcript Passages

Viewing Options

Full-Screen Viewing

Creating Video Clips

Making Clips

Clip List

Merging Clips

Deleting Clips

Editing Clips

Exporting Clips

Exporting Clips to PowerPoint

Exporting Clips to Sanction and Summation

Exporting Clips to Windows Media Player

Viewing Clips in Windows Media Player

Exporting Clips to Email

 

Why We Recommend our YesLawDVD Deliverable Disc for Litigators

When synchronizing a court reporter’s transcript to video to facilitate a litigator’s use of video, we recommend delivery with our YesLawDVD software.  A YesLawDVD will include the synchronized transcripts for all the major trial preparation and presentation software applications, the video in MPEG-1, MPEG-2 and/or DVD-video, and the YesLawDVD player editor software that allows litigation professionals to easily edit and present select video clips as well as export directly to Sanction and Summation case databases or to PowerPoint presentations complete with scrolling text.

Unique to the YesLawDVD disc is inclusion of the YesLaw software on the deliverable disc along with the synchronized transcripts and media such that litigators need not install software into their computers – they often do not have administrative privileges for their firm-provided computers.  No copy protection is applied to the software or video so that it may be easily copied to computers and run without installation of the software.

The YesLawDVD software is compatible with MPEG-1, MPEG-2, and DVD-video (VIDEO_TS) video formats as well as WAV, WMA and MP3 audio-only formats.  Unique among the synchronized legal video players, the YesLaw DVD software provides frame-accurate MPEG-2 editing.

Litigators can quickly and easily edit video clips, re-order and combine clips, present in full screen with or without captions, or export to other trial presentation software including PowerPoint with scrolling text.

Tutorial

There is an online tutorial that quickly reviews the general operation of the software.  This is a great place to start.

http://www.yeslaw.net/YesLawDVD_Introduction/YesLawDVD_Introduction.html

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The Subtitles Do Not Show in My Clips

When you export clips as stand-alone files, these clips can be played in Windows Media Player with subtitles.  Each export of a clip exports four separate files: a video file, an SMI file (has a .SMI filename extension), a text file containing the corresponding transcript text, and a clip list text file for importing the clip into Sanction and Trial Director using their clip list import function.

To play a video clip in Windows Media Player, simply double-click on the video file.  To display the transcript text as captioning, you must ensure the SMI file created when exporting the clips remains in the same directly as the media file and the name of the SMI file remains exactly the same as the media file save the three-letter filename extension at the end.  So if you copy the media file to another directory or computer, you will also need to copy the SMI file into the same directory.  If you rename the media file, you will need to rename the corresponding SMI file similarly (again save the three-letter filename extension).

To enable the display of the captioning within Windows Media Player, you must enable this function within Windows Media Player in two locations.  Under the Play menu and under the Lyrics, Captions, and Subtitles or just Captions submenu, select “On” or “English.”

Then under select the Tools > Options menu item to open the option window and select the Security tab.  Then check the Show local captions when present option.

You may need to restart the application for these two changes to be implemented.

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The Video Will Not Play in PowerPoint

When you export clips into a PowerPoint presentation, be aware that the video is not saved within the PowerPoint file as is text and graphics.  Rather the PowerPoint presentation saves a pointer or the path to the included media (audio or video file).  This keeps the size of PowerPoint presentations small, but can cause confusion.  When a PowerPoint presentation that contains video or audio clips is copied to another directory or to another computer, the audio and video do not necessarily also get copied.  When you attempt to play the PowerPoint presentation from the new location or in the new computer, the audio and video will not play and unfortunately PowerPoint does not make it clear why.  You will need to copy the audio or video files into the same directory as the PowerPoint presentation being careful not to change the name of the audio or video files.  Then when the PowerPoint presentation plays from the new location (directory or computer) it will first try the path to the audio or video files as previously saved.  Likely this path is no longer valid in this new directory or computer.  When that does not work, PowerPoint will attempt to look for the audio or video file in the same directory as the PowerPoint file itself.  If it finds a file with the matching name, it will play that audio or video file.

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How Do I Export Clips to a DVD Video Disc

Once you have edited your clips, you may export those clips to stand-alone media files that can be played in Windows Media Player.  The tutorial below provides some tips…

http://www.yeslaw.net/Play_in_WMP/Play_in_WMP.html

But these clips cannot simply be copied onto a DVD disc to play in a stand-alone DVD player.  The video must be formatted in just such a way to be compatible with DVD-players.  The media files must be the proper format, named in a certain way, even copied onto the disc such that each video file immediately follows the previous as the laser reads the DVD disc.  You might think of this as how audio tracks were recorded onto records.  And a number of other files are required.  The process of creating a DVD playable disc from media files is called authoring.  The authoring software is not presently included on the YesLawDVD discs.  Your PC DVD software may include this function, but most do not.  Your legal videographer can create a authored DVD-video disc from your clips.

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Synchronized Transcript File Formats

YesLawDVD discs should come complete with native synchronized transcripts for all the major trial preparation and presentation applications.  Below is a table of the different transcript types identified by their three-letter file name extension, their corresponding application, and other applications that also support import this file type.  Rather than importing a non-native file format into an application, we recommend you use the native transcript format when available for target application.

Synchronized Transcript Formats

File Extension

Application

Applications That Can Import This Format

.MDB

Sanction II

LiveNote, Summation. TextMap, Trial Director, and Visionary Pro

.LEF

LiveNote

 

.SBF

Summation

 

.CMS

Trial Director

 

.XMEF

TextMap

 

.PTF & .VID*

Real Legal

LiveNote

 

* Note that the .PTF and .VID files must go as a pair.  The .PTF file includes the text transcript and the .VID file includes the by-line synchronization time stamps.

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Video Formats

YesLawDVD video discs may include different video formats including MPEG-1, MPEG-2, and MPEG-2 authored into DVD-video format or may include audio-only WAV, WMA or MP3 audio files.

Only the DVD-video format provides video written to the disc to be compatible with stand-alone DVD players on which one would play Hollywood movies.  The video quality can be that of Hollywood movies.  MPEG-2 nominally provides 720 pixels horizontally by 480 pixels vertically – video quality commonly referred to as “standard definition” or “SD.”  MPEG-2 is a newer standard and there are royalty payments required to support the standard however, most litigation applications now support the MPEG-2 format although not as authored into the DVD-video format.  Authored DVD-video discs can be recognized by exploring the contents of the DVD disc to necessarily find a VIDEO_TS folder containing one or more .VOB files that include the MPEG-2 video data as well as an .IFO and .BUP file.

YesLawDVD discs with DVD-video are compatible with stand-alone DVD players.  The disc is chaptered by transcript page number to quickly jump to corresponding video and the transcript text is rendered as subtitles which can be turned on and off with the DVD remote.  Such discs also include the video as stand-alone MPEG-2 files and the synchronized transcripts reference these stand-alone MPEG-2 files to maintain compatibility with the litigation software which prefer the stand-alone MPEG files.

The MPEG-1 format predates MPEG-2 and was the format used on video CDs or VCDs – before DVDs were introduced.  The file size is smaller to fit onto smaller-capacity CD discs.  But the MPEG-1 video quality is not as good as MPEG-2.  MPEG-1 video is nominally 352 pixels horizontally by 240 pixels vertically.  Unlike MPEG-2, the MPEG-1 standard is sufficiently old now to be royalty free and is therefore most commonly supported by the litigation applications.  Practically speaking this quality of video will not show sufficient detail to see written text on documents or photograph details.

Video Format Comparison

Video Format

Quality/Detail

Description

MPEG-1

352x240 pixels

Comparatively smaller file size, poorer quality, less video detail but most commonly supported

MPEG-2

720x480 pixels

“Standard definition” with larger file size but better Hollywood-movie style quality.

DVD-video

720x480 pixels

Created with MPEG-2 video so same video quality but “authored” or written to the disc to be compatible with stand-alone DVD players.

 

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Playback in a DVD Player

If the video format on the disc is DVD-video, the disc may be played in a stand-alone DVD player or in a PC able to player movie DVDs.  Insert the DVD into you player or PC and select Play on the DVD player or remote controller, or select Play within your PC DVD movie playback software.

Your DVD is “chaptered” by transcript page number. This allows you to quickly play a selected portion of the deposition navigating by transcript page number. Use your remote to select the desired transcript page and the playback will begin at the chosen transcript page and continue to play through the end of the disk. You may stop playback at any time and select a new transcript page from the Chapter Menu.

Depending upon the length of the deposition, several DVD disks maybe required to cover the entire deposition. Only the transcript pages covered by the disk will be presented in a disk's chapter menu.

Most PCs with a DVD drive installed will include DVD-movie playback software. Indeed inserting this DVD disk into a PC will most likely, automatically invoke this software. You can play this DVD as a DVD-movie within your PC. Use your mouse rather than your remote to navigate the DVD.

Should you wish to run the YesLaw DVD program instead, to access all the powerful collaboration and video editing tools, simply exit from the DVD-movie playback software, navigate to the DVD drive using Window Explorer, and run the YesLaw DVD program on the disk.

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Operation within a PC

Just place your YesLaw DVD into your DVD-ROM drive. Windows will likely detect the DVD-movie and automatically launch DVD movie player software. If not, use your windows browser to navigate to the YesLaw DVD program (YesLawDVD.exe) on the DVD disk and run the program by double-clicking.

If Windows does auto-launch the DVD-movie player software, you may watch the deposition as a DVD movie. Or should you wish to run the YesLaw DVD program to access all the powerful collaboration and video editing tools, simply stop and exit from the DVD-movie playback software, navigate to the DVD drive using Window Explorer, and run the YesLaw DVD program on the disk.

You may copy the entire contents of the DVD to a directory on your PC hard disk or external drive. A hard drive provides faster data access and quicker playback than a DVD drive. Due to the size of a DVD, copy all the files will take several minutes.

Once you copy the contents to your hard disk, you might still play the video using your DVD-movie playing software – this depends upon the software you use. Run your software, select File:Open, navigate to the disk contents data, and open the VIDEO_TS directory, you may further have to open the contained .IFO file (e.g. VTS_01_0.IFO). This process can be used for playing the video within Windows Media Player.

The YesLaw DVD software window is divided into two sections. The left half contains the transcript, if that was provided with your video. Click and drag the slider up and down to scroll through the transcript. You can “jump” to any spot in the transcript by simply by clicking on it. A double-click on a transcript line will begin video playback at the selected line.

The right side contains the main video viewing window. Here, you can play the video and any clips of it. Use the playback control buttons below the video to control the video playback.

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Searching the Transcript

As the video plays, the corresponding transcript line will be highlighted with an underline and a small triangle icon.

To find a word or phrase within the transcript, type it into the Search Box below the transcript and hit the Enter key or click the magnifying glass icon. Hitting the Enter key again or clicking the magnifying glass icon will find the next instance of the entered text within the transcript.

search

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Highlighting Transcript Passages

Any portion of the transcript can be highlighted with several possible highlight colors.  Select the text to be highlighted by clicking and holding the mouse button and dragging over the text and then clicking the highlight pen button below the transcript.

Alternatively you can quickly highlight several passages by first selecting the highlight tool by clicking the highlight pen button below the transcript.  The cursor will change to the highlight pen tool.  Now click and drag over the transcript text passages to be highlighted.  Clicking the highlighter pen button again de-selects the highlighter tool.

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Viewing Options

The program window can be resized by dragging the lower right corner. To quickly maximize the window size, mouse-click the maximize icon in the upper right corner.

To view the video filling the full-screen, select Show Full Screen from the View Menu or use the Ctrl+F keyboard shortcut. See Full-screen Viewing . To return to the windowed view, hit the Escape key, use the Ctrl+F shortcut, or click the window view button.

The transcript portion of the window has a number of view options available under the View Menu item including not showing the transcript at all. To show the transcript, ensure the Show Transcript option is checked under the View Menu. To hide the transcript, select the Show Transcript under the view menu or use the Ctrl+T keyboard shortcut. The transcript page numbers, line numbers and time stamps can optionally shown or not shown by selecting Show Page Numbers, Show Line Numbers, and Show Timestamps under the View Menu.

Transcript lines with linked exhibits are indicated with a document icon preceding the line. Transcripts lines with annotations are indicated with a small yellow note icon preceding the line. These indicator icons are optionally shown by selecting the Show Exhibit Icons and Show Annotation Icons under the View Menu. If transcript text is selected when linking an exhibit, the hyper-linked text will be shown as blue-underlined text. This text treatment can be optionally hidden by selecting Show Exhibit Hyperlinks under the View Menu. The highlighting of transcript text is also optional and can be changed by selecting the Show Highlights under the view Menu.

The main window includes three tear-off menu lists: linked exhibits list and annotations list adjacent to the transcript on the left and the video clips list adjacent to the video on the right. These lists are optionally shown or hidden by selecting the Show Exhibits List, Show Annotations List, and Show Clip List menu items under the View Menu. These lists can alternatively be shown or hidden using the triangular icons on the inside edges of the lists. The lists also can be separated from the main window and repositioned by dragging. To reattach to the main window, drag them bag near the edge of the main window and the will “snap” back into place.

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Full-screen Viewing

If you would like to view your video in a full screen mode, simply select Show Full Screen from the View Menu or use the Ctrl+F key shortcut. Once you're in full screen mode, you can return to the window view mode by hitting the Esc key. This is used when the program interface is note desired.

In full-screen mode, a small control window allows control of the video playback. This window will show while video playback is stopped and for a few seconds after video playback is begun and then will disappear on its own. The control window includes a play button, a stop button, a return to window view button, a blacken screen button and a show/hide-transcript-text toggle button.

A number of keyboard short cuts are also available in full-screen mode. While the video is playing it can be paused and resumed by hitting the Enter key. The up and down arrows will backup and advance one transcript line. The Home key will return the beginning of the transcript or clip, depending on what is being viewed. The B key will blacken the screen and pause the video. Hitting the B key again will return to the paused video or hitting the Enter key will return the video and resume playback.

fullScreenKey

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Creating Video Clips

Creating and using video clips is accomplished with a few simple steps: selecting the transcript for a clip, making a clip, and exporting a clip.

To begin making a clip, select the portion of the transcript that corresponds to the desired video. To select the transcript, click and drag over one or more transcript segments. To select two discontiguous transcript segments, select the first segment then hold down the Ctrl and select additional segments. You can also select segments by clicking at the beginning of a segment then hold down the shift key and click at the end of the segment.

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Making ClipsmakingClips

Once all of the segments are selected, mouse click the Make Clip(s) button below the transcript. If multiple segments were selected, the software will provide the option of making multiple clips – one for each selection, or making one composite clip from all the selections. Please note that multiple segment clips will be ordered by position in the transcript and not the order selected.

Return to the full transcript by selecting Back to Full Transcript from the Clips menu or by using the Esc keyboard shortcut.

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Clip List clipsList

Once a clip is made, the transcript portion of the window will update with only the selected text shown. The video portion will play only the corresponding clip video. The video clip will be added to the end of the Clip List.

You may rename video clips in the clips list by clicking to select the clip and selecting Rename Clip from the Clips Menu or using the Ctrl+R keyboard shortcut. Alternatively you may right-click the clip entry in the Clip List and select Rename Clip from the pop-menu.

Clips may be re-ordered in the list by clicking and dragging a clip to the new position.

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Merging Clips mergingClips

A new clip can be made by adding or merging together two or more existing clips. Select the clips (hold down the Ctrl key to select more than one clip) then select the Merge Clips button (two pieces of film and the + sign) at the bottom of the Clip List or right-click one of the selected clips and select Merge Clips from the pop menu. The original clips will remain in the list, but a new merged clip will be added to the bottom of the list. The clips will be ordered as they are in the clip list and not the order selected. To merge clips in a desired order, first reorder the clips in the list, then merge them.

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Deleting Clips delete

Unwanted clips can be deleted by selecting the clip and clicking the Delete Clip(s) button (trash) at the bottom of the Clip List or by right-clicking the clip and selecting Delete Clip from pop-up menu.

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Editing Clips <editIcon

Once a clip is made, you may wish to fine-tune the beginning and ending point of the clip. First select the clip then click the Edit Clip button (scissors) at the bottom of the clip list. Alternatively, you may right-click a clip and select Edit Clip from the pop-up menu. The portion of the window immediately below the video will update to provide the ability to adjust the beginning (green slider) and ending point (red slider) of the clip.

Use the play button to test your adjustments. To save time, first select play and then adjust the starting or ending point by moving the green or red slider. Each movement of the starting or ending point will cause the video to replay the newly-selected, starting or ending point. Once the starting and ending points are adjusted, select the Save button.

Nudge arrows allow quick adjustment of the starting and ending points by a fraction of a second.

edit

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Exporting Clips

Once clips are made, they may be exported in a number of different formats. First select the clip to be exported and then select Export Clip from the Clips menu. Alternatively you may right-click the clip and select Export from the pop-up menu. A window will appear providing a list of export options. Select the export option and click OK.

export

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Exporting Video Clips to PowerPoint

Exporting to PowerPoint first saves the video clip as a separate MPEG file in a folder called video. This video directory will be saved in the same directory as the PowerPoint presentation. The PowerPoint presentation will then link to this file in the video directory. To send the PowerPoint presentation to another person with the included video, the video directory must also be included. The video directory may include multiple video files for this one PowerPoint presentation.

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Exporting Video Clips to Sanction and Summation

Exporting to Sanction and Summation will only be available options if you have Sanction or Summation loaded in your local C:/Program Files directory – not run off a remote file server. You will need to select the destination Sanction Case Database for exports to Sanction. The export to Summation is compatible with Summation Blaze 2.5 and above.

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Exporting Video Clips to Windows Media Player

To export a video clip to a Windows Media Player-compatible file, you may select either MPEG or Windows Media file. Windows Media player will play either type of file. Exporting to Windows Media will export to a WMV formatted video file whereas exporting to Windows Media audio-only will export only the audio to a WMA file. Exporting to E-mail exports to a thumbnail-sized (smaller file size) WMV file.

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Viewing Video Clips in Windows Media Player

When a clip is exported in MPEG format, actually three separate files are created – all with the same file name but different extensions. The first is the actual MPEG video file (filename.mpg). The second is a .SMI file (filename.smi) that includes the transcript subtitles. When viewing the MPEG video file in Windows Media Player, you may optionally show the transcript as subtitles. To have this option, Windows Media Player must find this .smi file in the same directory and with the same filename as the .mpg file.

To view the transcript as subtitles, two options must be selected within Windows Media Player 10 and later. First select “On if Available” from the Play:Captions and Subtitles submenu. Second select “Show local captions when present” from the Tools:Options:Security tab.

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Exporting Video Clips to Email

Exporting to E-mail exports to a thumbnail-sized (small file size) WMV file and then runs your default email program and includes the file as an attachment. Simply choose a recipient, type your message, and hit “Send.”

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